PEARLITOL® 100 SD | Mannitol
The Science Behind

PEARLITOL® 100 SD | Mannitol

Peer-reviewed journal articles and scientific presentations describing use of  PEARLITOL® 100 SD mannitol

Study 1

Comparative analyses of flow and compaction properties of diverse mannitol and lactose grades 

Paul S, Chang SY, Dun J, Sun WJ, Wang K, Tajarobi P, Boissier C, Sun CC.

International journal of pharmaceutics. 2018 Jul 30;546(1-2):39-49. Copyright owner: Elsevier B.V. Publisher Elsevier B.V.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2018.04.058
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
© Elsevier B.V.

Abstract

Appropriate selection of excipient grade during tablet formulation development depends on thorough knowledge in their compaction and flow properties. Each chemically unique pharmaceutical excipient is usually available in several commercial grades that are widely different in powder properties, which influence their performance for a specific formulation application. In this work, 11 grades of mannitol were systematically characterized, in terms of their particulate, flow and tableting properties, and compared against five grades of lactose. Principal component analysis (PCA) identified significant correlations among selected variables, such as particle size, surface area, flowability, wall friction, plasticity parameter, tensile strength, and tablet brittleness. PCA also revealed similar grades of the two excipients, which may be used to select replacement grade, if needed, based on similarity in their overall properties.

Study 2

Controlled release from directly compressible theophylline buccal tablets

Boyapally H, Nukala RK, Bhujbal P, Douroumis D.

Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces. 2010 Jun 1;77(2):227-33.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2010.01.031
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
© Elsevier B.V.

Abstract

The aim of the current study was the development of theophylline buccal adhesive tablets using direct compression. Buccal adhesive formulations were developed using a water soluble resin with various combinations of mucoadhesive polymers. The prepared theophylline tablets were evaluated for tensile strength, swelling capacity and ex vivo mucoadhesion performance. Ex vivo mucoadhesion was assessed using porcine gingival tissue and the peak detachment forces were found to be suitable for a buccal adhesive tablet with a maximum of 1.5 N approximately. The effect of formulation composition on the release pattern was also investigated. Most formulations showed theophylline controlled release profiles depended on the grade and polymer ratio. The release mechanisms were found to fit Peppas' kinetic model over a period of five hours. In general, the majority of the developed formulations presented suitable adhesion and controlled drug release.